Call Us: (800) 530-4448

Call Us: (800) 530-4448
Call Us: (800) 530-4448

Electronic Security/Alarm Companies

SECURING YOU AND YOUR BUSINESS

Alarm / Electronic Security Companies

Not every broker understands what you need, we do!

We love this stuff and know how to get the right coverage for less money than you might think. Low voltage has been the core of our business since 1994. Very few brokers have been at it that long, even less actually know how to ensure a dealer, much less a central station.

  • Are you covered if your subcontractors insurance cancels?
  • Are you covered if you drop your customers 4K TV during an install?
  • Are you covered if you drill through a window pane and break the customers’ glass?

Our specialty program for the Alarm and Electronic Security Industry can be tailored to include:

General Liab.
Prof. Liability
Workers Comp
Auto
Property
Cyber
Mmgt. Liability
Regulatory Risk / Statutory Coverages

You depend on your insurance coverage, so work with a pro. Have questions? Contact us at (800) 530-4448 or ask your question in the form below

We’re not slick. We’re honest and have a passion for what you do. If you’re a new dealer, get the right insurance from us. If you’re a central station know that we do it right, not just for you, but for the dealers that you rely on.

Not every broker understands what you need, we do!

We love this stuff and know how to get the right coverage for less money than you might think. Low voltage has been the core of our business since 1994. Very few brokers have been at it that long, even less actually know how to ensure a dealer, much less a central station.

  • Are you covered if your subcontractors insurance cancels?
  • Are you covered if you drop your customers 4K TV during an install?
  • Are you covered if you drill through a window pane and break the customers’ glass?

Our specialty program for the Alarm and Electronic Security Industry can be tailored to include:

General Liab.
Prof. Liability
Workers Comp
Auto
Property
Cyber
Mmgt. Liability
Regulatory Risk / Statutory Coverages

You depend on your insurance coverage, so work with a pro. Have questions? Contact us at (800) 530-4448 or ask your question in the form below

We’re not slick. We’re honest and have a passion for what you do. If you’re a new dealer, get the right insurance from us. If you’re a central station know that we do it right, not just for you, but for the dealers that you rely on.

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General Liability
Insurance protecting commercial insureds from most liability exposures other than automobile and professional liability.

Professional Liability
A type of liability coverage designed to protect traditional professionals (e.g., accountants, attorneys) and quasi-professionals (e.g., real estate brokers, consultants) against liability incurred as a result of errors and omissions in performing their professional services. Although there are a few exceptions (e.g., physicians, architects, and engineers), most professional liability policies only cover economic or financial losses suffered by third parties, as opposed to bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) claims. This is because the latter two types of loss are typically covered under commercial general liability (CGL) policies. The vast majority of professional liability policies are written with claims-made coverage triggers. In addition, professional liability policies contain what are known as "shrinking limits," meaning that unlike CGL policies (where defense costs are paid in addition to policy limits), the insurer's payment of defense costs reduces available policy limits. Accordingly, when attempting to determine appropriate policy limits, insureds must consider the fact that because defense costs are often a high proportion of any claim settlement or judgment, they must usually purchase additional limits. The most common exclusions in professional liability policy forms are for BI, PD, and intentional/dishonest acts.

Workers Compensation
The system by which no-fault statutory benefits prescribed in state law are provided by an employer to an employee (or the employee's family) due to a job-related injury (including death) resulting from an accident or occupational disease.

Auto
As the term is currently defined in Insurance Services Office, Inc. (ISO), commercial auto and commercial general liability (CGL) insurance policies, any land motor vehicle, trailer, or semitrailer designed for travel on public roads; or any other land vehicle that is subject to a compulsory or financial responsibility law or other motor vehicle insurance law where it is licensed or principally garaged. The term "auto" does not include "mobile equipment." This definition is important in determining whether liability coverage is afforded under an auto liability policy or a CGL policy (in the case of mobile equipment).

Property
First-party insurance that indemnifies the owner or user of property for its loss, or the loss of its income-producing ability, when the loss or damage is caused by a covered peril, such as fire or explosion. In this sense, property insurance encompasses inland marine, boiler, and machinery (BM), and crime insurance, as well as what was once known as fire insurance, now simply called property insurance: insurance on buildings and their contents.

Cyber
A type of insurance designed to cover consumers of technology services or products. More specifically, the policies are intended to cover a variety of both liability and property losses that may result when a business engages in various electronic activities, such as selling on the Internet or collecting data within its internal electronic network.

Most notably, but not exclusively, cyber and privacy policies cover a business' liability for a data breach in which the firm's customers' personal information, such as Social Security or credit card numbers, is exposed or stolen by a hacker or other criminal who has gained access to the firm's electronic network. The policies cover a variety of expenses associated with data breaches, including: notification costs, credit monitoring, costs to defend claims by state regulators, fines and penalties, and loss resulting from identity theft.

In addition, the policies cover liability arising from website media content, as well as property exposures from: (a) business interruption, (b) data loss/destruction, (c) computer fraud, (d) funds transfer loss, and (e) cyber extortion.

Cyber and privacy insurance is often confused with technology errors and omissions (tech E&O) insurance. In contrast to cyber and privacy insurance, tech E&O coverage is intended to protect providers of technology products and services, such as computer software and hardware manufacturers, website designers, and firms that store corporate data on an off-site basis. Nevertheless, tech E&O insurance policies do contain a number of the same insuring agreements as cyber and privacy policies.

Mmgt. Liability
Insurance that covers exposures faced by directors, officers, managers, and business entities that arise from governance, finance, benefits, and management activities (also called "executive liability insurance"). This includes (1) directors and officers (D&O) liability insurance, (2) employment practices liability (EPL) insurance, (3) fiduciary liability insurance, and (4) "special crime" insurance (covering kidnap, ransom, and extortion exposures). These coverages may be written as stand-alone insurance policies or combined into a single, "package" policy. Management liability policy "package" policies usually contain a set of common conditions applying to all of the coverage lines purchased. In most cases, an insured must select a minimum of two types of coverage to be eligible to purchase a management liability "package" policy. This arrangement offers meaningful premium discounts because much of the same data is needed to underwrite employment practices, D&O, fiduciary, and special crime coverages. Management liability "package" policies are usually available only to privately held firms, not-for-profit organizations, and small publicly traded companies (i.e., those with annual sales of under $25 million). Large publicly traded firms generally purchase stand-alone policies.

Regulatory Risk / Statutory Coverages
Regulatory Risk: The risk that a change in laws and regulation will significantly impact an institution. A change in laws or regulations enacted by a governmental or regulatory body can dramatically increase the costs of conducting a business, decrease the attractiveness of an investment, or change the competitive landscape. For example, regulatory risks arising from climate change concerns include (1) more vigorous disclosure requirements regarding a manufacturer's emissions and (2) the emergence of minimum performance standards tied into energy consumption and greenhouse gas emission controls.

Statutory Coverages: Lines of insurance required by law, such as workers compensation, auto liability, and pollution liability (for underground storage tanks and waste disposal sites).

General Liability
Insurance protecting commercial insureds from most liability exposures other than automobile and professional liability.

Professional Liability
A type of liability coverage designed to protect traditional professionals (e.g., accountants, attorneys) and quasi-professionals (e.g., real estate brokers, consultants) against liability incurred as a result of errors and omissions in performing their professional services. Although there are a few exceptions (e.g., physicians, architects, and engineers), most professional liability policies only cover economic or financial losses suffered by third parties, as opposed to bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) claims. This is because the latter two types of loss are typically covered under commercial general liability (CGL) policies. The vast majority of professional liability policies are written with claims-made coverage triggers. In addition, professional liability policies contain what are known as "shrinking limits," meaning that unlike CGL policies (where defense costs are paid in addition to policy limits), the insurer's payment of defense costs reduces available policy limits. Accordingly, when attempting to determine appropriate policy limits, insureds must consider the fact that because defense costs are often a high proportion of any claim settlement or judgment, they must usually purchase additional limits. The most common exclusions in professional liability policy forms are for BI, PD, and intentional/dishonest acts.

Workers Compensation
The system by which no-fault statutory benefits prescribed in state law are provided by an employer to an employee (or the employee's family) due to a job-related injury (including death) resulting from an accident or occupational disease.

Auto
As the term is currently defined in Insurance Services Office, Inc. (ISO), commercial auto and commercial general liability (CGL) insurance policies, any land motor vehicle, trailer, or semitrailer designed for travel on public roads; or any other land vehicle that is subject to a compulsory or financial responsibility law or other motor vehicle insurance law where it is licensed or principally garaged. The term "auto" does not include "mobile equipment." This definition is important in determining whether liability coverage is afforded under an auto liability policy or a CGL policy (in the case of mobile equipment).

Property
First-party insurance that indemnifies the owner or user of property for its loss, or the loss of its income-producing ability, when the loss or damage is caused by a covered peril, such as fire or explosion. In this sense, property insurance encompasses inland marine, boiler, and machinery (BM), and crime insurance, as well as what was once known as fire insurance, now simply called property insurance: insurance on buildings and their contents.

Cyber
A type of insurance designed to cover consumers of technology services or products. More specifically, the policies are intended to cover a variety of both liability and property losses that may result when a business engages in various electronic activities, such as selling on the Internet or collecting data within its internal electronic network.

Most notably, but not exclusively, cyber and privacy policies cover a business' liability for a data breach in which the firm's customers' personal information, such as Social Security or credit card numbers, is exposed or stolen by a hacker or other criminal who has gained access to the firm's electronic network. The policies cover a variety of expenses associated with data breaches, including: notification costs, credit monitoring, costs to defend claims by state regulators, fines and penalties, and loss resulting from identity theft.

In addition, the policies cover liability arising from website media content, as well as property exposures from: (a) business interruption, (b) data loss/destruction, (c) computer fraud, (d) funds transfer loss, and (e) cyber extortion.

Cyber and privacy insurance is often confused with technology errors and omissions (tech E&O) insurance. In contrast to cyber and privacy insurance, tech E&O coverage is intended to protect providers of technology products and services, such as computer software and hardware manufacturers, website designers, and firms that store corporate data on an off-site basis. Nevertheless, tech E&O insurance policies do contain a number of the same insuring agreements as cyber and privacy policies.

Mmgt. Liability
Insurance that covers exposures faced by directors, officers, managers, and business entities that arise from governance, finance, benefits, and management activities (also called "executive liability insurance"). This includes (1) directors and officers (D&O) liability insurance, (2) employment practices liability (EPL) insurance, (3) fiduciary liability insurance, and (4) "special crime" insurance (covering kidnap, ransom, and extortion exposures). These coverages may be written as stand-alone insurance policies or combined into a single, "package" policy. Management liability policy "package" policies usually contain a set of common conditions applying to all of the coverage lines purchased. In most cases, an insured must select a minimum of two types of coverage to be eligible to purchase a management liability "package" policy. This arrangement offers meaningful premium discounts because much of the same data is needed to underwrite employment practices, D&O, fiduciary, and special crime coverages. Management liability "package" policies are usually available only to privately held firms, not-for-profit organizations, and small publicly traded companies (i.e., those with annual sales of under $25 million). Large publicly traded firms generally purchase stand-alone policies.

Regulatory Risk / Statutory Coverages
Regulatory Risk: The risk that a change in laws and regulation will significantly impact an institution. A change in laws or regulations enacted by a governmental or regulatory body can dramatically increase the costs of conducting a business, decrease the attractiveness of an investment, or change the competitive landscape. For example, regulatory risks arising from climate change concerns include (1) more vigorous disclosure requirements regarding a manufacturer's emissions and (2) the emergence of minimum performance standards tied into energy consumption and greenhouse gas emission controls.

Statutory Coverages: Lines of insurance required by law, such as workers compensation, auto liability, and pollution liability (for underground storage tanks and waste disposal sites).